Florida’s real estate tax laws can be tricky to understand. There are several factors which affect the size of your property tax bill,Guest Posting so if you’re buying property in Florida or are relocating, it’s important to understand how taxes are calculated.

Property values are in constant flux just as the real estate market is, so getting an accurate, current assessment is important. The assessed value of the property you buy may change dramatically when it changes hands, so it’s good to be aware of the factors that might influence how much tax you pay.

As well as market rates your real estate tax bill will also depend on the tax rate for different local government bodies. The property you buy will be subject to taxes from several different bodies, including county and city government, the school board, hospital district, and water district. There may be additional taxes if you live in a masterplanned community.

On the other side of the coin, homestead exemptions and the “Save our Homes” amendment help limit the amount of your property tax bill.

County Taxes

The amount you pay in county property taxes will, of course, vary depending on the value of your property. However, they’ll also vary depending on the tax rate in your county, and where in the county you live. This is because within a county, some regions are incorporated and some are unincorporated, and unincorporated regions tend to have lower property taxes. If you live in Temple Terrace, some areas of New Tampa or the City of Tampa, for example, you’ll likely be paying more in property taxes than someone living in Lutz or some portions of New Tampa, as the former locations are incorporated and the latter are not. Unincorporated areas generally are lower because they do not have “city” taxes.

Community Development District Tax

People living in a Florida masterplanned community or community development district will likely have additional taxes to pay. These extra taxes are what enable the developers of these communities to add extra amenities to enhance the lives of residents. By sharing the cost of community and land development among residents, additional facilities such as recreation centers, parks, walking trails, and sports facilities can be added.

Depending on the community, the tax may have two separate parts. One is a fixed amount that is payable for a fixed amount of time (usually no more than twenty years) – the bond portion. The second amount can vary from year to year depending on the needs and netfile budget of the community. If you’re interested in relocating to one of these communities it’s important to find out how much residents are expected to pay each year, as the total varies widely depending on the community, the different villages within the community and the types of facilities and services the master planned community provides as a whole.

Note that the responsibility for paying these taxes is tied to the property, not to the owner. If the property changes hands, payment of community fees and taxes becomes the responsibility of the new owner. An owner does have to option to pay off the bond portion of the CDD for their property, thus reducing the amount owed yearly to only include the working capital needed to maintain the community.

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